Editorial

Always Obey The Highway Code

The tragic death of a father and daughter last Monday puts a bright spotlight on the importance of safe driving in the Federation.

The police is not doing enough to put a stop to bad driving on our roads.

It is unacceptable that nearly every month that someone has to die from a traffic accident. It simply means people are driving too fast and without due care.

Drivers it seem have no regard for the consequences of bad driving.

Fifty-three-year-old Ebenezer Edmeade and his 21-year-old daughter Delsa of Saddlers Village lost their lives after the vehicle in which they were travelling collided with another while on their way home.

No one witnessed the accident and the police do not know what led to the accident. However more and more people are complaining that people are just driving too fast on the main roads.

The Ministry of National Security needs deploy more patrol cars on the road with radars to catch speeding motorists.

Also, instead of cutting back on subsidizing fuel maybe the Government need to draw up policy that would allow the police to issue more tickets for traffic violations for extra revenue. This idea may not be practical but a typical day in the Federation one can easily spot eight to ten traffic violations. Where is the police to write the tickets?

Yes, the tragic accident has many unnerved and maybe one should not be so quick to lay blame on the police.

Blame should rest with us, for we allow our friends to speed unnecessary or we allow the bus drivers race one another on the main road. We need to stop speeding and we need to drive more responsible with a greater sense consideration for one another.

It does not matter who maybe in the wrong, because when a death occurs it almost useless to assign blame, especially in instances where a simple and easy act of courtesy would have avoided the whole matter.

We tender our condolences to the Edmeade family and hope that motorist young and old will sit up, open there eyes and drive more carefully, more responsibly and with more consideration. How hard can that be.