Independence Day is here again and all kinds of activities will mark the event.

Cocktails will flow, flags will fly; the armed and unarmed forces will march, the curious members of the public will watch them march and then it will be over. In a jiffy the celebration will end and things will continue as usual.

Some people won’t ever bother with the celebration. They will take the holidays to catch up on their household chores, or go to the beach to soak up the clean seawater. Others will simply go to sleep and give their bodies some extra rest.

What it adds up to is that for most of the people of St. Kitts and Nevis the concept of independence has very little meaning. Even those who imbibe the liquor and eat the food are unable to credit the idea of independence with more than the food and drink, which they consume under the auspices of the governor-general and his deputy.

Many Kitttitians and Nevisians have ceased a long time ago to attach any significance to the state of Independence which comes up for celebration year after year.

The parameters are simply not there. The Nevis people are not independent.  They are still involved in an unequal yoke with the people of St. Kitts. Their journey to nationalism is frustrated by a relationship, which yields them nothing, not even self-respect.

They are held hostage by a few of their own who stand in the way of the freedom which the British provided for them under Section 113 of the Constitution.

One of the problems which impede freedom is the high price of land. It is ridiculous how our people are trapped by the high and unending mortgages for the small two-bedroom house and the small piece of land.

The situation is a trap. They are confined to a life in the ghetto, raising their children without the basic moral values, with boys and girls sleeping the same bedroom.

There are so many areas in which the spirit of independence is absent that we are left to wonder what independence is all about. Is it about the illustrious lives that the politicians live?