By Monique Washington

A free mentoring club, Mentoring All Leaders Everywhere (MALE), has been launched to assist young boys in the Brown Hill/Prospect area develop life skills through an initiative by two community members.

On Saturday, Eustace Nisbett and KerioBartlette launched MALE for Brown Hill Prospect area boys ages 11 to 18.

The club will meet every Saturday at the Prospect Community Center.

Nisbett told The Observer on Wednesday that 25 youth have already registered for the program. He and Bartlett are spearheading MALE in partnership with the Reach Hamilton Committee Group and with help from MariciaNisbett and Leroy Willet.  He outlined the major features of the new club.

“One feature of the program will be career development,” Nisbett said. “We will identify areas the boys are interested in, not just one. We will find businesses that will accommodate them, whether it’s for a half-day, day or week, so they can have a first-hand experience. It will teach them essentials skills like how to prepare breakfast, how to iron, and things like that. They will learn how to do resumes, how to write job letters, how to dress to go to an interview and how to conduct yourself during an interview.”

Nisbett added that there is a plan to begin bike and book clubs within the group and host an “elderly day” when participants will visit elders in the community to help them cook and clean. Participants will also be familiarized about their human rights.

Nisbett said it is very important to mentor boys into men and prepare them for life after school.

“At 12 you are going into high school and should start looking at things you are interested in, Nisbett explained. “You have to determine what career you might want. Participants will also be looking at subjects and if they need help with them, we will find someone to assist them.”

Career development will be an essential part of the program.

“Career development is to help young boys understand what it is like to work,” Nisbett explained.  “They will learn what is required and when they enter the work field, let them know they are expected to act like adults,” he said. Adding “they need to know they can no longer act like a child.”

In addition to career development, Nisbett pointed out MALE will assist any of the young men that look forward to attending college on a scholarship.

Although MALE is in its infant stage, Nisbett said that later on “it is our hope to expand throughout the island” and in the future add a girls’ club.”

Nisbett is preparing to complete studies to become a lawyer and has been involved in numerous social projects. He was the treasurer of the Brown Hill Unity Club; helped train Brownhill students in track and field, securing funds to buy uniforms for Inter-primary; taught math and computer science; formed cricket, softball and basketball teams and organized tournaments.

“I enjoy doing this type of project and it is something I do all the time,” Nisbett explained.

He looks at the group as a way to reduce crime among young men in the country and hopes the young men in the group will succeed in their life goals.

“People should not look at your weaknesses as a stumbling block, but rather as a stepping stone, something that you must overcome if you want to succeed in life,” Nisbett explained. “Our goal is to turn young boys into successful adults.”