Will he stay or will he go? That remains the big question for the Nevis Reform Party which was the big loser in Monday’s election. Will party leader Joseph Parry step down? So far the man isn’t saying much.

Even after Concerned Citizen Mark Brantley was sworn in as the new Nevis Premier, Parry remained silent and out of sight.. That was until the Observer contacted him Thursday a about circulating report of his resignation.

Mr. Parry said, “While there are changes ahead as the NRP moves forward,there is nothing to announce right now. We as a party will meet and decide which is the best to move forward and we will make announcements accordingly.”

The Observer then contacted NRP’s candidate for St. Johns Hensley Daniel who said “I have seen it all over the Internet that he has resigned” but “when he is ready he will make he will make it public.”

When questioned about a leadership change Daniel defeated by Brantley, said that is a matter for the party. “The party has to decide that. The party has an Executive and a General Counsel.

A powerful 75 member General Counsel and an even more powerful 22 member Executive. The recommendations will come from the constituencies and then they will be endorsed by the General Counsel then approved by the Executive. We have a structure,” he said.

The Nevis Island Assembly’s election had the Concerned Citizens Movement CCM being returned to office with four (4) seats to the NRP’s one (1) seat.

Mark Brantley of the CCM won Hensley Daniel of the NRP in district 2 St. John by 334 votes, Spencer Brand of the CCM won Robelto Hector of the NRP in district 1 St. Paul’s by 11 votes, newcomer Eric Evelyn of the CCM won Corey Tyson of the NRP in district 3 St George by 528 votes, Alexis Jeffers of the CCM won newcomer Virgil Browne of the NRP in district 4 by 305 votes and the Joseph Parry of the NRP won Keith Scarbrough of the CCM in district 5 St. Thomas’ by 289 votes.

Daniel didn’t lose gracefully, crying foul. He lamented,“Our democracy has now gone from one man one vote to one dollar one vote.”

“The worrisome thing is that money is the deciding factor in an election. Money played a major role in moving people to vote. There are several people who would not go to vote unless money is involved and that is a serious problem. How do you find all the money to meet everybody is the challenge?” he said.

“It is very common in politics to win an election and lose the country .Winning the election is the easy part, managing the country and providing opportunities for the people in the critical area of development like health education, housing and in particular crime reduction is a much harder affair . The truth is, is that people, we often don’t make the connection when you are electing people you are electing them to manage the state,” he said.

Daniel once an elected member in the Nevis Island Assembly sat with responsibilities in Health, Social Development, Culture, Trade and Industry.