PM Harris denies knowing about second Chinese fugitive

Basseterre, St. Kitts – The prime minister of St. Kitts and Nevis, the Honourable Dr. Timothy Harris, has denied knowing of a second Chinese national with St. Kitts and Nevis economic citizenship wanted by Interpol was allowed entry into St. Kitts and Nevis. In early July, multiple local and regional media houses claimed that a Chinese national with a St. Kitts and Nevis economic citizenship and wanted by Interpol arrived in St. Kitts at the RL Bradshaw International airport. Media houses in Antigua had reported on his arrival to that country from Canada before travelling to the federation.

According to reports in Antigua, the man was held in police custody and questioned, but was released and allowed to travel to St. Kitts. His arrival in St. Kitts and Nevis had received an alert about the individual’s imminent travel to the federation from the regional Advance Passenger Information System (APIS).

The Chinese national, similar to Ren Biao before him, is wanted for allegedly stealing millions of dollars in his home country, and, according to reports, was questioned by upon arrival in St. Kitts, but was not detained by authorities.

Speaking at his last press conference, Prime Minister Harris, who also serves as the minister of National Security, indicated that he was unaware of the incident.

Harris had criticized former prime minister, the Right Hon. Dr. Denzil Douglas, for allowing Biao to enter the federation in 2014 despite the Interpol Red Notice.

“They had receipt of an Interpol notice since May 2014, alerting that a gentleman was coming from London on a BA flight and they did nothing to prevent his entry into the country,” Harris had stated. “They allowed him to come into the country [and] facilitated sale of property to him because they had to sanction all of this for there to be property transfer.” Harris also claimed that Biao was a close associate of Dr. Douglas.

However, when questioned about the second fugitive, the prime minister noted that in any case, due process ought to be exercised

“It’s a complete difference,” he said. “I can’t speak to that case. I’m not aware of that. Due process has to be exercised at all times. That case you’re talking about, I can’t speak to the reality of what you are putting forward, and that would have been strictly within the ambit of the commissioner of police, who has not communicated to me with respect to that one.”