SKNFA President: Money Needed For Football Development by Glen Bart

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Football needs money for the sport to develop and be successful, says Anthony Johnson, president of the St. Kitts-Nevis Football Association (SKNFA). The SKNFA is preparing to host of Zone 6 of the CFU Caribbean Cup 2014 football tournament in St. Kitts, September 3 to 7. Johnson said it was costly to host and to participate in regional tournaments, and it requires broad support from the public, as well as the private and public sectors. Speaking of the need for corporate support in hosting the Zone 6 Caribbean Cup 2014 tournament, and of football development in general, President Johnson said, “Hosting these tournaments and participating in these tournaments come at a great cost. To host a tournament such as this costs a minimum of EC$250,000. Air travel alone, one way, to send the Women’s Senior Football Team to Trinidad cost us US$20,000 (EC$54,400). To participate in a regional tournament in the Turks and Caicos, with the senior female team, cost us about EC$65,000.”He indicated that as a member of CFU, the Football Association gets US$20,000 for hosting the competition, but that still leaves a shortfall of about EC$200,000. “We are responsible for accommodation, the ground transportation, as well as the meals of all of the visiting teams, as well as officials, who come in for the tournament. Gate receipts are not usually sufficient to cover the costs involved in hosting these tournaments, and it is for that reason that we urge gain since 1900: in that year, life expectancy worldwide was 32 years, compared to 69 now (and a projection of 76 years in 2050). The biggest factor was the fall in infant mortality. For example, even as late as 1970, only around 5% of infants were vaccinated against measles, tetanus, whooping cough, diphtheria, and polio. By 2000, it was 85%, saving about three million lives annually – more, each year, than world peace would have saved in the twentieth century. This success has many parents. The Gates Foundation and the GAVI Alliance have spent more than $2.5 billion and promised another $10 billion for vaccines. Efforts by the Rotary Club, the World Health Organization, and many others have reduced polio by 99% worldwide since 1979. In economic terms, the cost of poor health at the outset of the twentieth century was an astounding 32% of global GDP. Today, it is down to about 11%, and by 2050 it will be half that. While the optimists are not entirely right (loss of biodiversity in the twentieth century probably cost about 1% of GDP per year, with some places losing much more), the overall picture is clear. Most of the topics in the scorecard show improvements of 5-20% of GDP. And the overall trend is even clearer. Global problems have declined dramatically relative to the resources available to tackle them. Of course, this does not mean that there are no more problems. Although much smaller, problems in health, education, malnutrition, air pollution, gender inequality, and trade remain large. But realists should now embrace the view that the world is doing much better. Moreover, the scorecard shows us where the substantial challenges remain for a better 2050. We should guide our future attention not on the basis of the scariest stories or loudest pressure groups, but on objective assessments of where we can do the most good. Bjørn Lomborg, Director of the Copenhagen Consensus Center and an adjunct professor at the Copenhagen Business School, is the editor of How Much Have Global Problems Cost the World? A Scorecard from 1900 to 2050 . Copyright: Project Syndicate, 2013. www.project-syndicate.org

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