Full Independence for Nevis

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By Rupert McD Byron M.B.A. “Full Independence For Nevis Now” was the theme of a symposium which was held at the Red Cross building in Charlestown on August 7, 2008 to mark the 10th anniversary of the first referendum exercising the right of independence for Nevis which is written into the constitution of St. Kitts and Nevis, when 62% of the votes cast said YES for the full independence of Nevis.” The percentage required by the constitution for Nevis to be granted full independence is 67%. The symposium was opened with prayer in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ which was led by Pastor Eversley Pemberton and the chair was taken by Mr. Obi Everton Powell.” The speakers were Ms Nialah” Tyrell, Messrs Vance Amory, Collin Tyrell, Conrad Niah Liburd, Everton Hill, and Washington Archibald.” On August 12 there was a Let’s Talk panel discussion on VON radio station hosted by the chairman and a few speakers who took part in the symposium. This campaign for the full independence of Nevis NOW is at cross purposes with the celebration of the success of 25 years independence of St. Kitts and Nevis because the two claims are irreconcilable.” For those of us who are in support of the claim for the full independence of Nevis NOW, the first 25 years of the independence of the Federation of St. Kitts” and Nevis do not spell SUCCESS, but rather the failure of the inalienable right of Nevis to achieve self-determination which is written into the Constitution of St. Kitts and Nevis An undeniable example of what can happen when a country is united is its determination to achieve self-determination can be seen in the Anguillan revolution of 1967.” This revolution was the result of Anguilla’s determination to govern themselves instead of being governed by a St. Kitts administration with unlimited powers of unitary statehood.” Anguilla resolutely refuse to take part in any of the plans for the inauguration of statehood in February 1967. Soon afterwards the warden and the police were forced to leave Anguilla and a state of emergency was declared by the government.” On May 31, 1967 a delegation was sent to St. Kitts from Anguilla and made the following demands 1. The secession of Anguilla from the State. 2. Direct administration of Anguilla from Britain. 3. General elections for Anguilla. 4. Anguilla to become a state in association with Britain. These demands were not accepted by the State government. In a referendum held on July 11th 1967 1839 persons out of 2554 registered voters went to the polls to decide whether Anguilla should secede form the State.” 1813 voted in favour of secession, 5 voted against and 21 votes were spoilt. “On July 25th a conference was held in Barbados between delegates representing the Britain Colonial Office, the State government in St. Kitts, and the island of Anguilla.” This conference ended in a deadlock. On August 26, 1967, the elected representative for Anguilla resigned his seat in the House of Assembly, thus severing the last official link between Anguilla and the State government.” Anguilla never returned to the State of St. Kitts-Nevis -Anguilla but was given the status of a self-governing overseas territory in association with Britain similar to Montserrat and the British Virgin Islands. The campaign for the full independence of Nevis now is urging us to claim our right to the full independence of Nevis which is given to us by Clause #113 in the Constitution of St. Kitts and Nevis which recently celebrating 25 years of independence.” In other words we believe that it is high time for the people of Nevis to emancipate our country from 25 years of Nevisian disunity, federal government exploitation, and economic deterioration. This is what Everson Hull (Ph.D. Econ.) wrote on this subject in The St. Kitts-Nevis Observer on November 24, 2006: “On his first official post-election trip abroad our Premier, Hon” Joseph Parry, drew attention to the annual leakage in tax revenues to the Basseterre Treasury from Cable and Wireless and other large international conglomerations now operating in Nevis.” These revenues leakages have been estimated by our Premier at close to 10 million annually”” By contrast the independent experts at the Caribbean Development Band estimated the annual loss at $ 13.1 million to $ 17.8 million.” In The St. Kitts-Nevis Observer dated January 19, 2006 Dr. Hull wrote “It is absolutely necessary that we face up to the stark reality that we are being fiscally abused.” For the 6th year in a row the central Government of Basseterre has reported a deficit of over $5 million. This regime has racked up expenditures of $396.4 million in 2005.” Its revenue collections were $340.9 million, resulting in a $55.5 million deficit.”” One of the results of this deficit was the slashing of the Nevis Police budget by 11.7% to” $22.4 million:” while the St . Kitts Police budget was expanded by 14.5% to $16.3 Million.” End quote. Some of the statistics released at the symposium were PUBLIC DEBT FOR NEVIS AND ST. KITTS AT DECEMBER 2006 IN MILLIONS of E.C. $ Nevis $200—13.3 estimated 25 percent population St. Kitts $1,300—86% estimated 75% population STATISTICS RELATED AT THE SYMPOSIUM ON AUGUST 7, 2008 ESTIMATE OF GRANTS AND LOANS TO ST. KITTS AND NEVIS IN E.C. DOLLARS” From” 1973 to 2008 SOURCE”””””””””””””””””””””St. Kitts”””””””” Nevis Total OECS GRANTS $243,992,411″””””””””””$ 6,295,212″” “”””$250,287,623″ HURRICANE RELIEF” 55,649,734″ 55,649,734″ TAIWAN 75,046,213″””””””””””8,197,000″””””””””83,243,213 JAPAN ” 39,176,000″”””””””””””””””””””””””””” 39,176,000 “KUWAIT”””””””””””””””””17,073,000″ 41,693,250″”” “””””58,766,250 OECD LOANS” 94,779,811″”””””””””””””””””””” “””””””” 94,779,811

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