Information on the smart garbage bin lids includes what not to place inside. SKNIS Photo.

Officials urged residents in St. Kitts to preserve the integrity of the new smart bins which are designed to modernize the garbage collection on the island and to further the Solid Waste Management Corporation’s (SWMC) plan to enhance a comprehensive recycling programme while appearing on “Working for You” Wednesday, March 18.

“No Person shall interfere with any receptacle, whether public or private, in which litter is placed for collection, or interfere with the contents of the receptacle or remove any litter from the receptacle without the consent of the owner of the receptacle,” said Inita Lake, Collections Manager, while referencing the Solid Waste Management Act, 2009, warning that vandalizing bins could result in serious repercussions.

Any person found vandalizing any receptacle will be fined, or in some cases be imprisoned. Keithley Phillip, General Manager, strongly appealed for persons to obey the law and encouraged them to familiarize themselves with the Act which can be found online.

He asked for public cooperation and stressed there is no hidden political agenda surrounding the bins.

“We crave the cooperation of our citizens. Please let us not for one reason or the other let some foolishness get into our heads. If you do not want the bins just indicate and then a conversation can be held and that may change your mind. But for whatever other reasons, please note that it is a national initiative,” said Mr. Phillip, noting that “there is a reason why the bins” are outfitted with the colours “outside of what persons are conceiving in their heads.”

Yellow is internationally recognised as the colour for safety.

Ms. Lake encouraged persons to “keep their bins as clean as possible” adding that once finished with them, “it would be good if you hose them out so that you can continue with a clean environment.”

Households Urged to Pay Attention to Disposal Rules

The do’s and don’ts of what goes inside the new bins remain unchanged.

The acceptable categories are listed on the lid of the smart bins so residents can be informed, and in some cases, reminded, only everyday items should be discarded in the bins.

Unacceptable items include propane cylinders, acid batteries, paint or insolvent items, hazardous materials, tires, yard trash (branches, grass, etc.), used oil or oil filters, and sharp items.

“Needles that are used by [diabetic] persons and stuff like that we always recommended that they be placed in a thick plastic container and sealed properly, and hand given to the collectors,” Mr. Phillip said.