St. Kitts And Nevis Hosts Electricity Regulations Workshop

Key stakeholders including ministers of energy from across the region are attending the three-day workshop.
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Basseterre, St. Kitts – A three-day workshop focusing on the unique challenges of electricity regulation in small island states within the Caribbean commenced today, March 12, at the St. Kitts Marriott Resort, under the theme “Right-sizing Electricity Regulations in Small Island States within the Caribbean: How Far, How Fast?”

Key stakeholders including ministers of energy from across the region are attending the three-day workshop.

The workshop, which runs up to March 14, is a collaborative effort between the Government of St. Kitts and Nevis, the Organization of Caribbean Utility Regulators (OOCUR), and the Caribbean Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (CCREEE). It gathers key stakeholders including ministers of energy from across the region to tackle pressing issues surrounding energy insecurity, limited access to renewable resources, ageing power infrastructures, and the need for robust regulatory frameworks.

In his opening address, the Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Public Infrastructure, Energy and Utilities, Domestic Transport in St. Kitts and Nevis, Darryl Lloyd, highlighted the unique energy hurdles faced by the Caribbean’s small island states.

“Our region faces unique energy challenges with small island states contending with limited access to resources, outdated infrastructure and the complexities of globalised energy markets,” Mr. Lloyd stated. “The Caribbean electricity sector is at a crucial juncture. There is a growing emphasis on renewable energy integration, sustainability and the critical role of regulation,”  he further  noted, underscoring the importance of the workshop’s theme and emphasising the need for regulatory frameworks that recognize the unique circumstances of the region’s small island economies.

The United Kingdom’s (UK) Climate and Environment Attaché for the Caribbean, Alexander Gozney, from the British High Commission, spoke on the essential importance of shifting to low-carbon energy infrastructures.

“Transitioning to low carbon energy is critical for the resilience of small island states. Good regulation is needed for this transition. So the UK is pleased to be sponsoring this workshop on energy regulation in the Eastern Caribbean, which will complement our USD $25 million Renewable Energy programme in the region,” Gozney remarked.

The workshop is financially supported by the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) and the Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office (FCDO) of the United Kingdom, alongside technical assistance from the Fair Trading Commission in Barbados and the Office of Utilities Regulation in Jamaica.

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