Image: RT. The election map shows Biden leading, but will he be able to get the 270 electoral college votes necessary to assume the presidency? It all depends on a handful of "too close to call" states where the margin of victory or loss could depend on mailed-in votes counted after the election.

November 4th, 2020–As day dawned on the day after the US election, only one thing was clear, which was that the Biden landslide victory forecast by opinion polls and expected by most observers had not come to pass.

Amid the coronavirus-induced health crisis, a record number of ballots were cast before Election Day, totaling more than 100 million.

As to exactly where things stand, the presidential race is too close to call, with results in Wisconsin expected in the coming hours but other marginal states – Nevada, Georgia, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Michigan – potentially taking days to complete their counts.

Pre-election information suggests that more than half of Biden voters intended to vote by mail. In some states, like Florida, mailed-in votes have been counted ahead of the election date, but in others this is not allowed and a final result could come down to mailed-in votes, which are slow to count as each has to be checked against voter registration information, and matching signatures may also need to be checked.

The Biden campaign has rebuked Trump for his “outrageous” false claim that he had won the election, an asserted also repudiated by state Republican party leaders across the country.

Biden said he’s “on track to win this election” and “we’re feeling good about where we are.” He called for patience as the remaining votes are counted.

Election day overall was largely free of the kind of civil unrest that was feared, but the Trump campaign was calling on supporters to “defend” the election and uncertain days lay ahead.

The Republicans looked to pick up a handful of seats in the House of Representatives, with Democrats holding the majority. Control of the senate is still up in the air, but it looks to be unlikely that the Democrats can obtain a Senate majority. Even if the Democrats win the Presidential election, it would be virtually impossible for them to pass any legislation if they lacked a Senate majority.